The Trauma Lines Blog

Association of Traumatic Stress Specialists

Former Soldiers Conquer an Enormous Challenge

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Due to the current and unfortunate state of affairs, we tend to publish posts that document the challenges and roadblocks our soldiers are facing. This post is meant to focus on the positive.

Can you picture life without your legs? I know I can’t. Can you imagine climbing Mount Kilimanjaro? Ha, I definitely can’t; no way!

But for three former soldiers, life without their legs didn’t stop them from climbing one of the tallest mountains in the world:

[U.S. Army Sgt. Neil Duncan] and two other former soldiers, three men with one leg between them, have just come down from summiting 19,340-foot Mount Kilimanjaro, the highest peak in Africa. You read correctly: Three soldiers, one leg. Mountain climb.

The trio of Duncan (a 26-year-old Minnesotan, now in college in Colorado) and former Army sergeants Dan Nevins (39, lost both legs in Iraq, native of California) and Kirk Bauer (62, lost one leg in Vietnam, lives in Ellicott City) made their six-day ascent as part of the Warfighter Sports Challenge, a series of seven extreme events for permanently disabled veterans.

The Warfighter Sports Challenge is just one facet of a much larger program, run by non-profit Disabled Sports USA.

“If I can do this, I can do anything!” is the first thing you see when you visit www.dsusa.org (Disabled Sports USA). The Wounded Warrior Disabled Sports Project “is a partnership between Disabled Sports USA, its chapters and the Wounded Warrior Project, providing year round sports programs for severely wounded service members from the Iraq and Afghanistan conflict and the Global War on Terrorism.”

Be sure to visit the Wounded Warrior Project’s website to learn more. So while our vets are faced with a myriad of obstacles, programs and organizations like these are there to help our soldiers — our first responders — come together as one, and accomplish new goals and challenges.

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Written by traumalines

August 11, 2010 at 8:05 pm

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